http://www.philosophybites.com/ The design argument for God’s existence is that the appearance of design in the natural world is evidence for the existence of a divine designer. The specific version of the argument that Hume examines is one from analogy, as stated here by Cleanthes: The curious adapting of means to ends, throughout all nature, resembles […]

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http://www.acts17.net The so-called “new atheists” often portray themselves as the champions of reason. Yet a careful examination of their worldview reveals that atheism (more specifically, naturalism) undermines our reasoning ability. To see why, let’s consider some quotations from René Descartes, David Hume, and Charles Darwin.

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The 5th video in Dr. Richard Brown’s Online Introduction to Philosophy. For all videos see http://onlinephilosophyclass.wordpress.com/philosophy-101/

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A compelling introduction to Aristotle, considered by some the smartest person who ever lived. Aristotle was considered so dominant in philosophy that for centuries in the Middle Ages, he was simply referred to as “The Philosopher.” He invented logic; his scientific classifications are still more or less in use today. Aristotle’s thinking has always been […]

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Aristotle (Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης , Aristotélēs 384–322 BC)was a Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on the northern periphery of Classical Greece. His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle was a child, whereafter Proxenus of Atarneus became his guardian.At eighteen, he joined Plato’s Academy in Athens and remained there until the age […]

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Summary of Aristotle’s ideas regarding Finite Regress as found in his work, “Organon.” The particular purpose is to show how Aristotle believed humans make rational decisions and to link this notion to ethical decision making. Used for Introduction to Philosophy and Ethics courses at Alvernia University in Reading, PA.

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The 5th video in Dr. Richard Brown’s Online Introduction to Philosophy. For all videos see http://onlinephilosophyclass.wordpress.com/philosophy-101/

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In 1900, in Paris, the International Congress of Mathematicians gathered in a mood of hope and fear. The edifice of maths was grand and ornate but its foundations had been shaken. They were deemed to be inconsistent and possibly paradoxical. At the conference, a young man called David Hilbert set out a plan to rebuild […]

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What is mathematics about and how do we acquire mathematical knowledge? Is mathematics something discovered or invented? Daniel Sutherland discusses such issues in the philosophy of mathematics, explaining some of the basic difficulties involved in trying to say what numbers are and how we come to know them. This is an episode of Elucidations, a […]

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What was happening in philosophy in 1905? In this talk, Ray Monk seeks to answer that question by picking out some of the most influential works of philosophy that were published in or shortly before that year, describing both those works themselves and their intellectual context. The works discussed include Bertrand Russell’s On Denoting, Gottlob […]

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