John Searle (born July 31, 1932) is an American philosopher and currently a Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley.

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John Searle (born July 31, 1932) is an American philosopher and currently a Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Cogito ergo sum, descartes compared to philosophy in the Matrix trilogy, rationalism, perception of the world, systematic This clip is taken from the documentary ‘Return to the Source – Philosophy and the Matrix’ See it in full length here http://vimeo.com/53000177

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What is the difference between direct and indirect perception? This video explains the difference between the philosophical positions of direct and indirect realism and their commitments to direct and indirect perception of objects. Special thanks to Mike Samuel for making this video possible! Sponsors: Prince Otchere, Mike Samuel, Daniel Helland, Dennis Sexton, Will Roberts and […]

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Common sense takes for granted that we can typically just see physical objects without further hindrance. In this Wireless Philosophy video, Eugen Fischer (University of East Anglia) presents the ‘argument from hallucination’ that questions common sense: Together with parallel arguments, it appears to show that we are cut off from any physical objects around us […]

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Some random lecture by John Searle from one of his courses on the philosophy of mind. He discusses here the problem of perception and the views adopted throughout the history of philosophy, most of which involve the rejection of naive realism, which Searle takes to be the fundamental mistake. Searle doesn’t really give much of […]

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What do we experience when we look at an object – say, a tomato? A traditional view holds that we entertain an internal picture or representation of the tomato, and moreover that this internal picture is of the surface of the tomato, and not, say, the side of the tomato that is hidden from view. […]

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One of America’s most prominent philosophers says his field has been tilting at windmills for nearly 400 years. Representationalism (indirect realism)—the idea that we don’t directly perceive external objects in the world, but only our own inner mental images or representations of objects—has bedeviled philosophy ever since Descartes, and now is mucking up neuroscience as […]

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How can we know what the nature of reality is if we cannot step outside ourselves and our system of beliefs in order to check such beliefs against an independent reality? In this talk, Daniel Kaufman and Massimo Pigliucci discuss the history and evolution of philosophical skepticism, and how such a radical skepticism is important […]

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Fraser MacBride discusses the work of Bertrand Russell on the nature of sensible appearance and the logical structure of belief (judgment). This talk was given at a conference on Russell and his famous work: The Problems of Philosophy. Unfortunately, the audio isn’t the best, so it’s somewhat difficult to listen to. But it’s an interesting […]

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