From ‘A History of Western Philosophy’, Book Three, Part I, Chapter 17.

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http://www.philosophybites.com/ The design argument for God’s existence is that the appearance of design in the natural world is evidence for the existence of a divine designer. The specific version of the argument that Hume examines is one from analogy, as stated here by Cleanthes: The curious adapting of means to ends, throughout all nature, resembles […]

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An explication of the implications of optimism bias and how it can explain why you irrationally think that you can defeat the duplication argument, even when there is no rational reason to believe this. Sponsors: Daniel Helland, Will Roberts, Dennis Sexton, and Carl Green. Thanks for your support!

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An explanation of the Illusion of Control, a cognitive bias, and its implications for philosophy, religion and science.

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An introduction to our series on psychology and skepticism, and how various cognitive biases can provide a reasons to doubt that your beliefs are as justified as you may irrationally think they are. This series will include: Confirmation Bias, Optimism Bias, The Dunning-Kruger Effect, and The Illusion of Control.

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An explication of the position known as pragmatism as offered by William James and Charles Sanders Peirce (correction: the last name should be pronounced “purse” not “pierce”). Including the distinction between the tough minded and the tender minded, the squirrel analogy, and an extensive debate between pragmatism and skepticism. Guide: 00:00 Introduction 01:35 The Tough […]

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A description of the arguments of indirect Skepticism and how one can argue without beliefs.

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A description of “Indirect Skepticism”. A variant on Pyrrhonian skepticism we argue for here at Carneades.org.

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The first video in a series which will attempt to offer a defense of Indirect Skepticism. Annotations are having technical difficulties. Here are the links to the videos at the end: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSwkBsBARwM

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A description and argument for Meno’s paradox for attaining knowledge.

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