Here is a video examining the connection between faith and violence, and how when one is in an irrational disagreement, one can only resort to irrational persuasion. Sponsors: Prince Otchere, Daniel Helland, Dennis Sexton, Will Roberts and √2. Thanks for your support! Donate on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Carneades Buy stuff with Zazzle: http://www.zazzle.com/carneades Follow us on Twitter: […]

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In this Wireless Philosophy video, Joseph Wu (University of Cambridge) introduces you to the straw man fallacy. This fallacy is committed whenever someone misrepresents an opponent’s claim in arguing against it. Subscribe! http://bit.ly/1vz5fK9 More on Joseph Wu: http://bit.ly/1RHIOuV —- Wi-Phi @ YouTube: http://bit.ly/1PX0hLu Wi-Phi @ Khan Academy: http://bit.ly/1nQJcF7 Twitter: Tweets by wirelessphi Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1XC2tx3 Instagram: […]

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Joseph Wu (University of Cambridge) explains the fallacy of equivocation, the fallacy that occurs when the same term is used with different meanings in an argument. Along the way, he discusses whether Miley Cyrus is an exploding ball of gas. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/HWfP/

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In this video, Paul Henne (Duke University) explains the post-hoc-ergo-propter-hoc fallacy. This is an informal fallacy committed when a person reasons that because one event happened after another event, the first event caused the second. He also discusses why it is sometimes hasty to conclude that your cat scratch caused your fever. Help us caption […]

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In this video, Jordan MacKenzie discusses a type of informal fallacy known as the argumentum ad populum fallacy, or the appeal to the people fallacy. This fallacy occurs when one attempts to establish the truth of a conclusion by appealing to the fact that the conclusion is widely believed to be true. Help us caption […]

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In this video, Paul Henne (Duke University) describes the ad hominem fallacy, which is an informal fallacy that arises when someone attacks the person making the argument rather than their argument. He also describes the four subtypes of this fallacy. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/Fo66/

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In this Wireless Philosophy video, Paul Henne (Duke University) describes the fallacy of division, the informal fallacy that arises when we assume that the parts of some whole must have the same properties as the whole they make up. He also discusses why water molecules aren’t wet. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/FigJ/

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In this video Matthew C. Harris (Duke University) explains the informal logical fallacy called begging the question and the associated concept of circular reasoning. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/FrvH/

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In this video, Matthew C. Harris (Duke University) explains the fallacy of denying the antecedent, the formal fallacy that arises from inferring the inverse of a conditional statement. He also explains why graduate students might also be humans. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/Ftz0/

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In this video, Matthew C. Harris (Duke University) explains the fallacy of affirming the consequent, the formal fallacy that arises from inferring the converse of an argument. He also explains why you sometimes cannot conclude that you should bathe in a tub of peanut butter. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/FtzZ/

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